Enzymes

Pepsin Facts

How is pepsin formed ? Peptic and mucous cells in the stomach secrete pepsinogen. This pepsinogen has no digestive capability. As soon as it comes in contact with hydrochloric acid in the stomach it forms pepsin or gastric protease. If pepsin were secreted directly it would digest the protein in the cells that produced it. It’s active in a pH…

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Enzymes

Lactase Facts

Lactase is the enzyme responsible for breaking down lactose in the small intestine. If the lactose is not properly broken down it will sit in the colon where it ferments via the bacteria present there. This will cause pain and diarrhea. This condition is called lactose intolerance, milk intolerance, lactase deficiency or lactose malabsorption. It’s caused by: Decreased level of…

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Enzymes

Rennin Facts

Rennin breaks down casein in milk products. It’s also known as chymosin and is a proteolytic enzyme produced by the chief cells in the stomach. Its purpose is to curdle milk in the stomach. This prevents the milk from flowing through the stomach so that the proteins can be digested. This is very important in children. Rennin is at its…

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Enzymes

Protease Facts

Proteases are also called proteolytic enzymes. When they are consumed with food they break down the proteins in that food. Examples of protein are meat, eggs and fish. Proteases also play a key role in the body’s immune function. They can be taken between meals to assist in immune imbalances, inflammatory conditions, circulatory disorders, heart disease, stroke, heavy metal toxicity,…

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Enzymes

Lipase Facts

The enzyme responsible for breaking down fat or lipids is called lipase. It’s found in the stomach and also is used by the body to ward off allergic conditions and infectious viruses. Another name for lipase is lipolytic enzyme. Lipids include: Triglycerides such as fats and oils Phospholipids such as lecithin Sterols such as cholesterol Lipases are the second most…

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Enzymes

Amylase Facts

Amylase breaks down carbohydrates. They’re called amylolytic enzymes. Carbohydrates include: Sucrose- a disaccharide commonly called cane sugar. Sucrase splits sucrose to glucose and fructose. Fructose- a monosaccharide found in fruit and honey. Lactose- a disaccharide found in milk. Lactase splits lactose to glucose and galactose. Starches- large polysaccharides found in nonanimal foods especially grains. Amylase splits starch to maltose, which…

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Enzymes

Cellulase Facts

Cellulases break down cellulose and are a form of carbohydrase. Cellulase hydrolyses cellulose into the smaller units of monosaccharide (glucose) and disaccharide (cellobiose). It’s found in the digestive juices of some wood-boring insects and various microorganisms but not in mammals. Cellulose is the substance, which makes up most of a plant’s cell walls and is the primary building material for…

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Enzymes

Sucrase Facts

Sucrase breaks down sucrose to glucose and fructose. It’s secreted by the tips of the villi of the epithelium of the small intestine. When sucrase isn’t secreted in the small intestine it’s called sucrose intolerance, or Congenital Sucrase-Isomaltase Deficiency. The result is excess gas production with diarrhea and malabsorption. Sucrase-Isomaltase Deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive disorder where there is…

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Enzymes

Carbohydrases- The Most Complicated Category of Enzymes

Carbohydrases break down carbohydrates and it’s the most complicated category of enzymes, because it includes enzymes to break down sugars, complex carbohydrates, fiber and cellulose. The basic carbohydrases are called amylases. They help break down complex carbohydrates that are found in fruits, vegetables and legumes into simple sugars. Carbohydrates raise blood sugar If you have low blood sugar or crave…

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Enzymes

Maltase

Maltase breaks down disaccharide maltose to the simple sugar glucose and is produced by the cells that line the small intestine. It’s secreted by the surface cells of the villa, which are thin projections on the mucosa. Maltose or malt sugar is the least common disaccharide in nature. It’s present in germinating grain, in a small proportion in corn syrup,…

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